An Actual Day Out with Archaeology Shetland

As opposed to our spoof video from a few seasons ago, in June we had a long day out with Archaeology Shetland that rather more accurately captures the heart of our outings. It was a 10-hour trek through the Neolithic axe factory to contemplate Iron Age sites running along the line of lochs beginning with Roer Water and ending at Lang Clodie Loch. These sites, two of which were catalogued and expeditiously excavated in 1902/4, are of a late Iron Age Pictish typology whilst the last site at Lang Clodie Wick is likely a standalone wheelhouse built in a rather Western Isles style with revetment into a hillside.

Although the day started with fog, a confident sun drove the mist from our midst whilst chastising our exposed skin - at least those of us foolish enough to have left the sunscreen behind. It was a glorious day, wonderful thoughts and conversation with a general vibe of positivity as we regarded these unique sites. At times the alacrity was necessary as fording swollen burns threatened to become the theme of the day. Nonetheless, we managed to fight through the fatigue and boggy ground to have a most rewarding day.

Although we cannot always promise soggy socks and scorching sun (especially this!), feel free to join us in the further adventures of Archaeology Shetland as we journey through Shetland's archaeological landscape.

Waterfalls
Lang Clodie Wick Wheelhouse
Burn of Roerwater Multicellular Site
Fording the Burn of Roerwater
The line of lochs
Looking down on the corbelled cells of Birka Water
Roer Water Multicellular Site
Yet another swollen burn...
A Brief Break

Past Site in Focus articles can be found in the Archive.